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Think Like a Boss-Own the Job!


by Michael Getlan

The thing that separates employees who stagnate and ones who excel is the ability to show the boss that they are looking out for the interests of the company or the boss before their own. This one quality can make or break a job assignment or a career.

Loyalty is one of the most important qualities that someone can demonstrate. If a worker is loyal, to the company and to the boss, he or she can accomplish a great deal for that organization. While intelligence is surely important and training critical, looking out for the organization and thinking like the boss is the path to success.

Owning the Job

While parts of an operation can be delegated, and often should be, it is the responsibility of the person who accepts the assignment to see it through and to be on constant guard as to the process of the work.

That's what owners (and good bosses) do-they take ownership of the job. They see it through. And that's the behavior that gets rewarded. The staff members who demonstrate this behavior get the best assignments and get promoted. And that kind of behavior can be duplicated-which is good news for everybody.

It is the behavior, and the results, that counts. Many people talk a good game, but in the end it is behavior and results that are judged. Both are important-and rightly so.

We don't live in an age where leaving a trail of dead bodies is considered a good way to do business (though some of us who believe what we see on television might disagree!), but in this world of lawyers and lawsuits, the how of business is very important.

Demonstrating Behavior

Taking ownership of a job means being involved with the course that the assignment takes (what will be done), who is doing the different parts of the assignment, and how the different parts will be accomplished. Who contributed, who was rewarded, and how the team was managed-someone must manage these aspects of any job.

While it is true that some bosses do not seem to care about these things, most do and will reward for a "job well done" (and if you work for one who does not, you might think about changing jobs). Most bosses want their staff members to follow their example. And since taking an ownership stance means looking out for the company as a whole, most bosses, if they are good ones, set good examples.

Your behavior, like any boss's, is a reflection on the company. Owners and bosses have to think about what their behavior says about the company to their employees and the people that they (and the company) do business with.

Employees reflect how they are treated. They will treat suppliers and customers the same way that they are treated. Again, for employees, this means putting the interests of the company before their own, and demonstrating the kind of behavior that accomplishes the task and maintains the company interests. And doing it over and over again.

Fulfilling the Promise-Getting Results

The real proof is in the results. Having a final goal, or a continuing set of sub-goals, is an important part of getting results. Without a goal in mind at the start, how do you know when the job is finished? Some tasks, of course, are continuous, and these need to be evaluated on a periodic basis.

Make sure that you start any project with an understanding of the task and the expected or desired results. Some tasks will have clearly tangible and measurable results and some will have an intangible component, one that will be much harder to measure. In these cases, you must still have a good idea of what you and your team must accomplish.

Monitor the progress of the task, as often as necessary to be confident that all is going well. Ask for assistance if you need it; no boss likes to hear that you knew you were in trouble and neglected to ask for aid. Prepare a report at the end of the task and be able to demonstrate/evaluate your results.

Be prepared!

Remember to give and take credit when due. Show that you have been thinking about the interests of the company. When you are done, ask for the next assignment, to show that you are willing and able to take on new tasks. Demonstrate the behavior that will propel you to the forefront of your boss's attention, and let him or her know that you think like a boss!

Reprinted with permission from the March issue of Funworld © 2000

© 2000 Amusement Consultants, Ltd.  All Rights Reserved.

   

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